Spotlight Community Partnerships

Spotlight Community Partnerships 2018-08-06T10:26:14+00:00

Here is a sampling of some of our current community health collaborations and projects. To learn more about a project, or the DFMCH’s Office of Community Health, please contact OCH Director Kirsten Rindfleisch, MD.

Hmong Community Health Needs Assessment

Kevin Thao, MD, MPH, is partnering with local organizations to improve Hmong health in Wausau.

Kevin Thao, MD, MPH, is partnering with local organizations to improve Hmong health in Wausau.

Hmong physician Kevin Thao, MD, MPH, a faculty member at the DFMCH’s affiliated Wausau Aspirus Family Medicine Residency Program, is partnering with the Aspirus Health Foundation, the B.A. and Esther Greenheck Foundation and other local organizations to launch the Survey of the Health of the Wausau Area Hmong Population.

The study aims to determine the prevalence of diseases such as hypertension, diabetes and heart disease in the Hmong, and identify the extent of and reasons for disease disparities between the Hmong and the general population.

Dr. Thao is also building a coalition of local organizations that are working to improve Hmong health in Wausau.

Community Hot-spotting Partnership

Partners in the CARE project, from left: MFD Division Chief Johnny Winston, Jr.; Dryden Terrace Apartments Service Coordinator Kelsey Eyers; DFMCH faculty Jennifer Edgoose, MD, MPH; MFD Assistant Division Chief Laura Laurenzi, MFD; DFMCH resident Christopher Danford, MD.

Partners in the CARE project, from left: MFD Division Chief Johnny Winston, Jr.; Dryden Terrace Apartments Service Coordinator Kelsey Eyers; DFMCH faculty Jennifer Edgoose, MD, MPH; MFD Assistant Division Chief Laura Laurenzi, MFD; DFMCH resident Christopher Danford, MD.

DFMCH residents, faculty and staff are collaborating with the Madison Fire Department (MFD), Public Health Madison Dane County, and local neighborhood residents on a pilot outreach project called “CARE: Community Action Resource and Education.”

They’re meeting monthly with residents of the Dryden Terrace apartments, a housing development for seniors and the disabled located near the UW Health Northeast Family Medical Center in Madison. It’s an outgrowth of “hot-spotting” by MFD that identified Dryden Terrace as a focus of disproportionate resource utilization in Madison.

The project is an opportunity for DFMCH, MFD, Public Health Madison Dane County and community members to identify community needs, develop focused outreach services and potentially replicate similar support models at other locations.

The Prairie Kitchen at the Badger Prairie Needs Network

Brian Arndt, MD, (on right) prepares a meal with two participants in the Prairie Kitchen Cooking Club.

Brian Arndt, MD, (on right) prepares a meal with two participants in the Prairie Kitchen Cooking Club.

The DFMCH’s Melissa Stiles, MD, and Brian Arndt, MD, are partnering with the Verona Senior Center, the Badger Prairie Needs Network (BPNN) and local market Hy-Vee to help seniors learn how to prepare nutritional, affordable meals—and learn how good nutrition can help improve their health.

They’ve creating the Prairie Kitchen Cooking Club, a monthly two-hour class for people aged 55 and over from around Dane County. The class kicks off with an introductory nutrition presentation by Dr. Stiles and a Hy-Vee dietician. Participants then prepare a meal together using recipes that work in smaller portions and that use ingredients available at BPNN’s food pantry.

Access Community Health Center / Wingra Family Medical Center Partnership

Eric Phillippi, MD (above), is one of 12 DFMCH residents who establish continuity clinics at Access Community Health Center / Wingra Family Medical Center.

Eric Phillippi, MD (above), is one of 12 DFMCH residents who establish continuity clinics at Access Community Health Center / Wingra Family Medical Center.

The DFMCH’s Wingra Family Medical Center partners with Access Community Health Centers to improve the health of people in South Madison and beyond.

The partnership provides adults, children and families with access to high-quality, culturally competent primary care in a Federally Qualified Health Center that’s recognized as a Level III Patient-Centered Medical Home by the National Committee for Quality Assurance.

The clinic offers integrated behavioral health services, dental care referrals, discounted pharmaceuticals and prenatal care. It ensures continuity of care for low-income and medically underserved populations, helping to reduce emergency department and hospital visits—and making a positive impact in the community.

The clinic also serves as a valuable site for health systems researchers developing best practices to serve diverse patient populations. In addition, DFMCH residents establish continuity practices at the clinic, which provides them with valuable skills to become community-responsive health care professionals and makes them more likely to work in underserved communities in their future practices.

community-garden

DFMCH faculty, staff, residents and community advisors created a volunteer garden at the UW Health Verona Clinic. In 2015, the garden yielded over 700 pounds of food, which was donated to the community. From left, community advisors Martha and Douglas Maxwell; resident Vincent Minichiello, MD; faculty Brian Arndt, MD; and radiologic technician Elena Prozorova.