Research Faculty & Scientists

Faculty & Scientists 2018-01-18T08:58:54+00:00

Bruce Barrett

Bruce Barrett, MD, PhD, Professor

My focus is on mind-body training that will allow people to improve their health, reduce costs for healthcare, and lessen effects on the environment.

Future projects where students, residents or fellows could engage:

  • Performing data analysis on a project seeking to assess the effects of mindfulness on a person’s carbon footprint

Randy Brown

Randy Brown, MD, PhD, FASAM, Associate Professor

My work focuses on services addressing prevention and treatment of substance misuse and related complications outside of specialty substance abuse treatment settings. That is, my work is applicable to primary care, hospitals, the criminal justice system, and the general community (e.g., needle exchange programs, availability of naloxone for first responders, etc.). There is at least a 30% lifetime prevalence of risky or problem substance use, making it a significant public health threat.

Current projects where students, residents or fellows could engage:

  • Analyzing survey data from multiple projects, both for primary and secondary outcomes
  • Develop new survey questions arising from already-gathered data
  • Mining existing data for new hypothesis generation

Rachel Grob

Rachel Grob, MA, PhD, Senior Scientist

My work focuses on understanding the diversity of patient experiences. We need to elicit, synthesize, and amplify patient voices in order to assure our prevention and care systems are organized around what patients actually need.

Current projects using the depression health experiences module where students, residents or fellows could engage:

  • Performing secondary data analysis
  • Disseminating the resource
  • Assisting with the design of potential clinical and quality improvement interventions
  • Pilot work for developing the next module

David Hahn

David Hahn, MD, MS, Senior Scientist

As the Director of the Wisconsin Research & Education Network (WREN), I oversee a diverse project portfolio. WREN both spearheads projects and works with collaborators in a variety of subject areas who bring projects to us for our expertise in practice-based research. Importantly, WREN serves as a conduit for developing projects emanating from the questions clinicians face in their daily practice. Special interest areas include health literacy, Shared Decision Making, and other patient-centered research questions.

Current projects where students, residents or fellows could engage:

  • Analyzing preliminary data for hypothesis generation
  • Streamlining approaches to engaging clinicians and clinic teams in future projects

Irene Hamrick

Irene Hamrick, MD, Associate Professor (CHS)

My research focuses on improving the quality of life for older adults through real-life, easy-to-integrate behavioral modifications.

Current projects where students, residents or fellows could engage:

  • Data analysis from a variety of ongoing studies on falls prevention and home safety
  • Performing literature reviews on the connection between dehydration, falls and stroke

Larry Hanrahan

Larry Hanrahan, PhD, Senior Scientist

My research focuses on two areas:

  • Using big data to map correlations of clinical care and census/social determinants data to understand local variation in health and health care, and develop practical solutions to improve health in the locations where challenges are greatest.
  • Practice improvement for the research enterprise. I am interested in understanding how we can leverage technological and other advances to perform research better, faster and cheaper with a higher rate of reproducibility.

Current projects where students, residents or fellows could engage:

  • Identifying information systems requirements and background research findings that could help us understand how health care systems can most positively impact social determinants of health
  • Inventory connections between known public health data and community programs, and use that information to evaluate program effectiveness
  • Rapid research projects that use electronic health record data to quickly answer clinical questions; publish these findings
  • Assist with the research process improvement process, including documentation of steps, testing of interventions, and identifying opportunities for explicit knowledge transfer

Marlon Mundt

Marlon Mundt, PhD, Assistant Professor

I search for new ways to raise the quality of care for primary care patients. The continuous theme that carries throughout my research is that communication and relationships among clinicians matter for the delivery of high-value cost-effective care. More socially interconnected and less hierarchically organized primary care teams provide better quality of care at lower medical costs.

Current projects where students, residents or fellows could engage:

  • Performing secondary data analysis for new hypothesis generation
  • Conducting literature reviews in preparation for grant proposals

Nancy Pandhi

Nancy Pandhi, MD, PhD, MPH, Assistant Professor

Primary care is fundamental to human health, increasing longevity, reducing costs, and providing health-confidence. My studies aim to improve the effectiveness of primary care by incorporating the voices of patients and communities, and working with health systems to be more responsive to that input.

Current projects where students, residents or fellows could engage:

  • Performing literature reviews in preparation for grant proposals
  • Quantitative and qualitative data analysis from multiple projects
  • Assisting with the design of potential clinical and quality improvement interventions

Andrew Quanbeck

Andrew Quanbeck, PhD, Assistant Professor

My research draws on systems engineering concepts to develop innovative approaches to transfer what we know about how best to perform clinical care into viable ways to do it.

Current projects where students, residents or fellows could engage:

  • Performing literature reviews in preparation for major grant proposals
  • Performing secondary data analysis for new hypothesis generation

David Rabago

David Rabago, MD, Associate Professor

I have two lines of research in complementary integrative therapies for common conditions: Saline Nasal Irrigation (SNI) for acute and chronic upper respiratory conditions, and prolotherapy (dextrose injection) for chronic musculoskeletal pain. Upper respiratory conditions and chronic musculoskeletal pain are among the most common issues faced by individuals, and are frequent causes for patient visits to healthcare clinics. SNI and prolotherapy have the potential to significantly reduce human suffering, improve public health, and reduce medical costs.

Current projects where students, residents or fellows could engage:

  • Assisting with quality improvement projects on prolotherapy for low back pain and knee osteoarthritis
  • Performing literature reviews in preparation for major grant proposals

Paul Smith

Paul Smith, MD, Professor (CHS)

My studies focus on effective communication between physicians and patients and their caregivers. Better communication among these individuals has been shown to improve outcomes and lower costs.

Current projects where students, residents or fellows could engage:

  • Validation of caregiver survey questions and associated manuscript preparation

Jon Temte

Jon Temte, MD, PhD, Professor (CHS)

My work centers on novel approaches for infectious disease (predominantly influenza) detection in schools, long-term care facilities, clinics, and other sites where infections can quickly surge. By constantly monitoring patterns of illness and disseminating up-to-date data on disease prevalence, we provide clinic teams necessary tools for situational awareness, allowing them to make the best possible clinical choices for their patients.

Aleksandra Zgierska

Aleksandra Zgierska, MD, PhD, Assistant Professor

My work focuses on the opioid epidemic and strategies to reduce opioid-related harms, including integrative health modalities. Sadly, overdose deaths have become the leading cause of injury death in the United States, overtaking motor vehicle deaths as the leading cause in 2013, thus this research is crucial to the health of the nation.

Current projects where students, residents or fellows could engage:

  • Conceptualize opportunities for multi-faceted program development
  • Identify opportunities for cross-cutting multi-stakeholder research