2014 I-PrACTISE Conference Summary

2014 I-PrACTISE Conference Summary 2016-11-16T07:57:34+00:00

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Second I-PrACTISE Conference held In Madison, WI

The National Collaborative for Improving Primary Care Through Industrial and Systems Engineering (I-PrACTISE) held its second meeting in Madison, WI March 9 – 11, 2014. This collaborative, which was started by the late Ben-Tzion Karsh, Ph.D., has brought together primary care clinicians and industrial engineers over a 13 year period to use the tools and methods of engineering to improve the quality of primary care while improving the quality of work life for clinicians and staff.

The launch of this conference began on March 9th with a welcome reception honoring the life and work of Professor Ben-Tzion (“Bentzi”) Karsh, and was attended by a total of 55 colleagues, friends and family members as well as conference attendees from Madison and the US. There was a spirit to carry forward Bentzi’s memory and expand the creative educational and research network he started.

The I-PrACTISE Conference was attended by 69 participants, with a total of 52 participants coming from WI. There were 22 experts in Primary Care, 15 experts in Engineering and the remainder from other related disciplines including psychology, nursing, pharmacy, administration and medical informatics. We had a total of 16 graduate level students and primary care residents who participated!

The conference opened with a plenary talk by Mark Friedberg, MD, a natural scientist from the Rand Corporation who spoke on “The Evidence Base for Improving Primary Care“. This talk was followed by three brief oral statements of interest made by John Beasley, MD and Pascale Carayon, PhD. The start of eight of the 15 minute Podium Presentations followed these comments, 2 held concurrently over a brief one and a half hour time frame.

This conference allowed both primary care and engineering researchers as well as other field researchers to present a “nutshell” of their research projects to the participants of the conference. Some of the research presented was a product of the collaborations stemming from the 2013 I-PrACTISE Conference. Participants could choose which presentation they wanted to attend. There was a balanced mix of research describing the interventions of Industrial and Systems Engineering (ISyE) approaches in Primary Care models or the collaborations between the two fields.

In the afternoon, participants were invited to attend one of two concurrent 90-minute workshops. There were a total of 4 workshops planned. The conferences held back to back were a combination of addressing primary care issues as well as addressing the improvement of health care through ISyE.

The evening dinner was enhanced by attendees selecting a dinner table group based on a defined issue discussion raised throughout the day. Of particular note was one table of attendees who decided to spearhead a journal worthy paper describing clinicians’ successes and/or disappointments in their practices that an ISyE approach might be utilized to further understand.

Richard Holden, PhD’s keynote address, “ISyE Science and Primary Care” introduced the next mornings’ activities. A lively discussion followed and then the remainder of the Podium Presentations.

Finally the Conference ended with a Panel Presentation by Christine Sinsky MD and Enid Montague, PhDTowards Evidence Based Policy and Technology in Primary Care” that engaged the audience in creating a wiki to answer the questions of policy and technology in Primary Care. The wiki will be available on the I-PrACTISE website.

Future Calls to Action

This 2014 I-PrACTISE conference succeeded by increasing local and national collaborations, not only through networking but also through web presentations and online teamwork. The long-term collaboration between primary health care and ISyE has solidified. We are building an evidence base now with more capacity for alliances, more research capacity and therefore can improve the delivery of primary care to patients.

We learned however, we need to focus more on securing partnerships with policy makers who make policies that make common sense and serve a purpose. We also know we need to engage patients and their families in these associations with policy makers, health care professionals and industrial systems engineers.


Schedule / Agenda Overview

2014 I-PrACTISE Schedule


Keynote Speakers

Mark William Friedberg, MD, MS, MPP

Mark William Friedberg, MD, MS, MPP

Mark William Friedberg, MD, MS, MPP, is a natural scientist, at the RAND Corporation and a practicing general internist. He is also a professor at the Pardee RAND Graduate School. His research focuses on performance improvement by health care providers, innovations in primary care, and methods for measuring health system quality and efficiency. Friedberg has developed and fielded surveys of patients, physicians, medical group leaders and other clinical staff. His clinical work has included ambulatory primary care and hospital-based internal medicine, and he is a clinical instructor in medicine at Brigham and Women’s Hospital and Harvard Medical School.

Video: The Evidence Base for Improving Primary Care

Dr. Friedberg will be speaking on “The Evidence Base for Improving Primary Care


 

Tosha Wetterneck, MD, MS, FACP, SFHM

Tosha Wetterneck, MD, MS, FACP, SFHM

Tosha Wetterneck, MD, MS, FACP, SFHM, is an Associate Professor of Medicine at the University of Wisconsin School of Medicine and Public Health in Madison, WI and practices as a hospitalist at the University of Wisconsin Hospital and Clinics. Dr. Wetterneck has performed patient safety research at the Center for Quality and Productivity Improvement (CQPI) since 2003. She was so inspired working with her Industrial and Systems Engineering colleagues that she left her QI duties to pursue a research career and get additional human factors training. She is a former AHRQ K08 Clinical Scholar during which time she obtained a Master’s degree in Population Health Sciences with an emphasis in quality of care and human factors from UW-Madison. Dr. Wetterneck’s research applies human factors engineering theories, concepts and methodologies to evaluate and improve healthcare quality and safety, in particular, with regards to technology design, implementation and actual use, and medication safety. She is PI of a AHRQ-funded randomized controlled trial to evaluate the impact of a team-based pre-visit planning intervention on physician mental workload and situation awareness. Dr. Wetterneck is also active advocate for patient care and the practice of safe, high quality medicine through health policy and is the immediate Past President of the Wisconsin Medical Society.

Dr. Wetterneck will be speaking on “Applying ISyE Methods to Understanding the Work of Primary Care”


Richard John Holden, PhD, MS

Richard John Holden, PhD, MS

Richard John Holden, PhD, MS, Assistant Professor of Medicine and Biomedical Informatics, Vanderbilt School of Medicine, applies human factors engineering and psychology to research and innovation projects in multiple healthcare settings, including primary care. His research uses human factors approaches to design and evaluate interventions, particularly health information technology (HIT), to support the work of healthcare professionals, patients (and families), and patient-professional collaboratives. Illustrative HIT projects include the design of patient-facing technology to support elderly heart failure patients, developing a national HIT usability framework (NIST), and evaluation of care coordination technology in primary care (AHRQ and NIMH/NIH).

Dr. Holden will be speaking on “Human Factors Contributions to Patient and Family Engagement

Video: Human Factors Contributions to Patient and Family Engagement


 

Christine A. Sinsky, MD, FACP

Christine A. Sinsky, MD, FACP

Christine A. Sinsky, MD, FACP, is a board certified general internist at Medical Associates Clinic and Health Plans, in Dubuque IA. She has focused her efforts at the intersection of technology, workflow optimization and teamwork in primary care. Dr. Sinsky is a co-author of the Institute of Medicine’s 2011 report, Health IT and Patient Safety: Building Safer Systems for Better Care and has twice provided testimony to the Office of the National Coordinator for HIT regarding the role of EHRs in care coordination and usability. She is the co-PI on an ABIMF sponsored study “In Search of Joy in Practice” identifying primary care innovations that contribute to improved patient care and better physician satisfaction.

Dr. Sinsky and Dr. Montague will co-panel “Towards Evidence Based Policy and Technology in Primary Care


Enid Montague, PhD, MS

Enid Montague, PhD, MS

Enid Montague, PhD, MS, Assistant Professor, Feinberg School of Medicine, General Internal Medicine Northwestern University, Chicago, IL explores how technology might change interpersonal relationships and the formation of trust between people and technologies and other aspects of the system. Her research involves exploring these concepts in the field, through laboratory experiments and by designing technologies that facilitate important social relationships. She explores these topics by understanding human capabilities and limitations and applying these findings to the design of technologies, systems and environments to promote health and wellness. A central focus in the research has been patient and provider interactions with technologies in primary care settings.

Dr. Montague with co-panel with Dr. Sinsky “Towards Evidence Based Policy and Technology in Primary Care


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Location & Accommodations

The Wisconsin Union Hotel at Union South
1308 West Dayton Street
Madison, WI 53715
Tel: 608-263-2600
Fax: 608-890-4422


About the Conference

This collaborative, which was started by the late Ben-Tzion Karsh, Ph.D., has brought together primary care clinicians and industrial engineers over a 12 year period to use the tools and methods of engineering to improve the quality of primary care while improving the quality of work life for clinicians and staff.